Hichwa Family Undergraduate Summer Research Fellowship

Established through the generous support of Dr. Bryant P. (C'68) and Ms. Diane V. Hichwa, this family fund annually supports an undergraduate student to carry out research in the department during the summer. After graduating from Georgetown University, Dr. Hichwa earned his Ph.D. at the University of Notre Dame and worked in both the academic world and industry. He taught physics at Hope College in Michigan for ten years. He spent twelve years at Optical Coating Laboratory, Inc. (OCLI) in Santa Rosa, rising to the level of vice president of research. In 2000, he became president of MetroPhotonics (USA), Inc., a Santa Rosa outpost of a Canadian telecommunications company, and joined the faculty of Sonoma State University in 2002 in the Department of Physics. He currently is an emeritus professor there.

Hichwa Fellows

2016: Bridget Johnson studied the self-assembly of molecules in solution. Working the Van Keuren lab, she used a laser based method called fluorescence correlation spectroscopy to characterize the first stage in the growth of organic nanoparticles being developed for biomedical applications.

2015: Nicholas Quirk conducted research on graphene-based microelectronics devices in Prof. Barbara's lab. He fabricated THz antennas and p-n junction field-effect transistors, and he tested their electrical properties.

2014: Andrew Stromberg performed initial experiments in the Urbach lab to study developing neurons using a high-resolution microscopy technique called Total Internal Reflectance Fluorescence.

2013: John Kerin worked with Prof. David Egolf to study medium energy interactions and decays using heavy hadron chiral perturbation theory.

2012: Andrew Jreissaty worked with Prof. Marcos Rigol on a project to explore whether a quantum distillation process previously seen in one dimensional system could also occur in two dimensions.

2011: Dionysios Koroulakis worked in the Van Keuren lab on the development of nanoparticles for the detection of cancer.